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  • 23 January, 2012

    La Vela

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 4:49 pm permalink

    La vela poster by Pablo Defendini

    La Vela Poster

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    Filed under: Prints
  • 23 January, 2012

    The Merchant of Venice

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 4:47 pm permalink

    The Merchant of Venice poster by Pablo Defendini

    The Merchant of Venice Poster

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    Filed under: Prints
  • 23 January, 2012

    Titus Andronicus

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 4:39 pm permalink

    Titus Andronicus poster by Pablo Defendini

    Titus Andronicus Poster

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  • 23 January, 2012

    The Tempest

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 4:37 pm permalink

    The Tempest poster by Pablo Defendini

    The Tempest Poster

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  • 23 January, 2012

    Hamlet

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 4:33 pm permalink

    Hamlet Poster by Pablo Defendini

    Hamlet Poster

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  • 15 January, 2010

    Under construction.

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 9:40 pm permalink

    With the advent of the new, new, New Sleekness, I’m thinking of turning this blog into something of a playground for me to fool around with WordPress for a little while. Most of the blogging that I do these days fits better on the New Sleekness anyway, and the paltry number of readers who come here for my personal musings will surely not mind me rearranging the furniture and generally breaking things for a little bit. I hope.

    The first thing to go is the theme, which has served me well for a number of years. The theme may come back, but only if I code it myself this time (I hired someone to do so last time, off my design). However, I really want to start off as simply as possible, so I’ll be dressing the site with Manifest, which is also the theme for The New Sleekness (so if I hit on anything nifty I can port it over to TNS right quickly), and very simple for me to build on.

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    Filed under: Uncategorized
  • 7 January, 2010

    Dreads

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 10:36 pm permalink

    I’ve wanted to write a post about my dreadlocks—the reasons I grew them and the reasons I cut them off—for a long time. It’s such a big subject to me, and something so personal, that I’ve shied away from it with a vengeance. The other day, though, reading a post by Tobias Buckell about dreads, rasta, and growing up, I spewed out a comment which more or less encapsulates the gist of it. I may come back to the topic, but in the meantime, here’s a bit of writing about my dreadlocks:

    I’ve never been religious, and am an avowed atheist, as you know, but since I’ve been exposed to rasta (admittedly later in life, after high school), I’ve known mostly nothing but the same kind of attitude you describe: discipline, commitment, the monk-like approach, as you say. So much so that, years ago, when I resolved to embark upon a major life-change, I decided to lock up in order to signify it.

    I approached one of my closer rasta friends, to inquire about how to go about it, half-expecting an indignant “how dare you”, and a swift dismissal. I should have known better. We sat down, we reasoned, and he said “Dreads are about constance, commitment, strength of spirit; it takes patience and mindfulness to lock up, especially for a man without natty hair, like you. I’d be grateful if you let me help you lock up. If you let me help you on your journey.” And so he did.

    For the years I was locked up, my dreads were a constant reminder to keep going, to stay the course, to not get discouraged when something didn’t quite go the way I wanted it to. It was also a wonderful exercise in patience, as my friend had said—watching them grow from short, skinny baby dreads into full, thick natty locks was a very gratifying experience.

    One day, years later, after I was at the place where I had wanted to be, I decided that it was time for another change. I had just embarked upon yet another phase in my life (the one I’m on now, actually), and I felt that I needed to lose baggage, etc. I cut off mine dread.

    I don’t regret having done it, but I still do miss them so.

    And I do. One day I may put myself back on that path and lock up again. But for now, I’m raspacoco.

  • 4 January, 2010

    2010.

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 8:52 am permalink

    Two words:

    Bring it, bitches.

    Well, three words, then.

  • 19 December, 2009

    OCD geekness.

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 7:15 pm permalink

    I just spent the last hour and a half coming up with the nicest, cleanest, most organized cable management solution I could muster, and I think I did a decent job. Check out the rest of the images on Flickr.

  • 18 December, 2009

    Smart.

    posted by Pablo Defendini at 3:34 pm permalink

    I’m not a huge fan of Michael Hyatt’s, generally speaking. I don’t think he’s often as smart as everyone thinks (I’m also aware that this is probably an unfair bias of mine, a symptom of my ingrained dislike of anything to do with superstition and deism). I’m happy to be proven wrong, on occasion, and today’s the day. Hyatt has posted a fantastic piece on his blog regarding the future of publishing (what, that old bag again?) which I think is spot-fucking-on, from intro to last paragraph. His bullet points below, but please do yourself a favour and check out the full post for Hyatt’s thoughts:

    The line between newspapers, magazines, and books is about to become blurred.

    Publishers will need to envision multimedia content from the beginning.

    Consumer expectations are going to skyrocket.

    The cost of producing digital books will get more expensive.

    Digital content creation and distribution will become our primary focus.

    People will be reading more than ever.

    It’s really a shame that none of the big six publishers seem to have this kind of clear-eyed, forward-looking leadership, and are more interested in whining and moaning about how their business model is under attack (um, yeah, it’s under attack because it’s not sustainable. It actually never was. Now get over it and find a new one).